skip to main content

Science Expo

George Washington Puppet Masters

George Washington Puppet Masters pic

As part of a STELLAR (Success in Technology, Enrichment, Library, Literacy, Artistry and Research) unit, first-graders at George Washington Elementary School in the district constructed gingerbread rod puppets with the help of the Center for Puppetry Arts, located in Atlanta, Georgia.

The students participated in a videoconference with the center’s distance learning puppeteer, Jeffrey Zwartjes, who discussed the history of gingerbread and explained that not all children around the world eat it. He also shared the ingredients needed to bake gingerbread.

In addition, Zwartjes compared several stories related to the classic “Gingerbread Man” tale, from “The Runaway Rice Cake” by Ying Chang Compestine and “The Musubi Man” by Sandi Takayama to “The Gingerbread Boy” by Paul Galdone, identifying the similarities and differences between each book. 

After watching a puppet show of “The Gingerbread Boy,” the first-graders followed step-by-step instructions to assemble their own gingerbread boys and girls. They fastened the torsos, bellies and legs together and taped two bendable straws to the tops and backs of their gingerbread personas to make them move around and dance.   

 

Board of Education Regular Business Meeting Notice - January 16, 2018

Attachments:

Board of Education Retreat - February 8, 2018

Attachments:

Chestnut Street Holiday Concert

Restructuring Presentation - December 19, 2017

restructuring flyer image

Attachments:

West Hempstead HS Winter Concert Photos

West Hempstead HS Winter Concert photos

Kindergarten Registration

Attachments:

Winter Concert

Winter Concert

West Hempstead Middle School Celebrates Red Ribbon Week

West Hempstead Middle School Celebrates Red Ribbon Week photo

West Hempstead Middle School students learned about the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse by participating in an array of activities during national Red Ribbon Week.

The week kicked off with a schoolwide banner contest, in which every homeroom entered their original “positivity banner.” Members of the school’s PTSA judged the entries based on their creativity and how well their images and messages conveyed success, happiness and kindness. 

Continuing the week, students attended an “Alcoholism and Drug Dependence” assembly, where they learned about the dangers and effects of drugs and alcohol on the body. 

Members of West Hempstead High School’s Students Against Destructive Decisions club paid the middle schoolers a visit the next day to teach them about destructive decisions through a game of bingo. Every student received a bingo card containing a drug- or alcohol-related term in each box. Winners were awarded a red ribbon for having five correct answers line up. 

Additionally, students and staff were encouraged to tie orange ribbons on a “Be the Good” sign along the school’s fence. By tying the knot, they pledged to make healthy choices and avoid drugs. Closing out the week, they made this same pledge by signing a large banner in the cafeteria.



Winter Concert

Cornwell Avenue Students Learn The Key To Success

Cornwell Avenue Students Learn The Key To Success photo

Students at Cornwell Avenue Elementary School learned about making healthy choices during the school’s annual Red Ribbon Week, themed “Our Future Is Key! We Pledge to Be Drug Free.”

The first- through fifth-graders participated in an assembly led by school psychologist Elyssa Mayer, who spoke about the dangers of drugs and alcohol and discussed ways to live a healthy lifestyle and spread kindness to all. 

Following the assembly, students pledged to live a drug-free life by writing their names on the school’s Red Ribbon Week banner.   



Celebrating West Hempstead’s Writers

Celebrating West Hempstead’s Writers photo

Sixth-graders in Karen Terwilliger’s class at West Hempstead Middle School recently showcased their original writing to classmates, teachers and administrators during the class’s Writing Celebration.

Since September, students penned three writing pieces – an autobiography, realistic fiction based on their life, and submission for the 2017-2018 National PTA Reflections program, whose theme this year is “Within Reach.” The program encourages students in grades K-12 to explore and be involved in the arts.

This exercise in the writing process taught the sixth-graders about developing their ideas, being creative and including supporting details to enhance their stories. Students also learned about the editing process by reviewing their own work for grammatical errors.

During the celebration, classmates, teachers and administrators gathered to read the students’ narratives. The guests made their rounds in the classroom, reading each story and leaving a positive comment about it.  



West Hempstead Grads Return For Science Major Alumni Day

West Hempstead Grads Return For Science Major Alumni Day photo

The West Hempstead High School Science Department hosted Science Major Alumni Day on Nov. 22, an annual event where current high school students engage with alumni of the district who have pursued or are currently pursuing careers in the sciences.

West Hempstead High School senior Gabriela Urena moderated the panel, asking alumni spanning the Classes of 2010 through 2017 about their majors, job opportunities and high school courses that helped prepare them for college. 

The discussion was followed by a question-and-answer session that gave the high school students further opportunity to interact with the alumni.



West Hempstead ENL Department Hosts Thanksgiving

West Hempstead ENL Department Hosts Thanksgiving photo

The West Hempstead Middle and High School English as a New Language Department hosted their annual Thanksgiving feast on Nov.  22, giving ENL students the opportunity to experience a beloved holiday tradition in the United States.

In prepareation for the celebration, students worked with their teachers to prepare a traditional Thanksgiving meal of turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, cornbread and pumpkin pie. 

On Wednesday, members of the ENL department served sixth- through 12th-graders the holiday meal and students shared holiday traditions and customs observed by their families with fellow classmates. 

The students also shared what they were thankful for this holiday by creating Google slides that expressed their appreciation for their parents, siblings, friends and teachers. 



West Hempstead Students Investigate Ancient Artifacts

artifacts photo

Third-graders at Cornwell Avenue and George Washington elementary schools were tasked with identifying “ancient artifacts” by using their observational skills as part of the Hofstra University “Art Travelers Through Time: Literacy and History Through Art” program.

According to the university’s website, the program provides elementary school students and teachers the opportunity to connect their classroom study of “Communities Around the World” to the study of authentic cultural objects from the museum’s large and diverse collections. These artifacts, and the experience of reading them closely, engage students in the discovery and creative thinking processes, supporting the development of essential 21st century skills and reinforcing classroom learning.

Throughout the program, third-graders engage in three separate interactions with museum educators. The first interaction began in November when Hofstra University Museum educator Elisa Bruno and graduate students Danielle Giovannitti and Brittany Kahn visited both schools to educate students on what observational skills they will need when they examine artifacts in the university’s museum. 

During their visit, Bruno, Giovannitti and Kahn presented four artifacts from circa 1915 for the third-graders to determine what the artifact was and its purpose.

Using their observational skills and magnifying glasses, students were encouraged to examine the color, shape, size, hardware, mechanics and details of the artifact, including manufacturing dates stamped on the bottom and features indicating years of use. Students then recorded their findings and discussed them within their group to determine what they thought the artifact was. 

Concluding the visit, each team presented its findings to the whole class, with all four groups making enough observations about the details of the artifact to correctly determine the object’s modern-day equivalent, despite it not resembling today’s toasters very much on the surface. 
Third-graders will complete the program with a visit to the Hofstra University Museum, where they will examine artifacts, and conclude with a follow-up visit from museum educators to reinforce the program’s theme and concepts learned that further connect with the school’s curriculum. 



West Hempstead Students Investigate Ancient Artifacts

Third-graders at Cornwell Avenue and George Washington elementary schools were tasked with identifying “ancient artifacts” by using their observational skills as part of the Hofstra University “Art Travelers Through Time: Literacy and History Through Art” program.

According to the university’s website, the program provides elementary school students and teachers the opportunity to connect their classroom study of “Communities Around the World” to the study of authentic cultural objects from the museum’s large and diverse collections. These artifacts, and the experience of reading them closely, engage students in the discovery and creative thinking processes, supporting the development of essential 21st century skills and reinforcing classroom learning.

Throughout the program, third-graders engage in three separate interactions with museum educators. The first interaction began in November when Hofstra University Museum educator Elisa Bruno and graduate students Danielle Giovannitti and Brittany Kahn visited both schools to educate students on what observational skills they will need when they examine artifacts in the university’s museum. 

During their visit, Bruno, Giovannitti and Kahn presented four artifacts from circa 1915 for the third-graders to determine what the artifact was and its purpose.

Using their observational skills and magnifying glasses, students were encouraged to examine the color, shape, size, hardware, mechanics and details of the artifact, including manufacturing dates stamped on the bottom and features indicating years of use. Students then recorded their findings and discussed them within their group to determine what they thought the artifact was. 

Concluding the visit, each team presented its findings to the whole class, with all four groups making enough observations about the details of the artifact to correctly determine the object’s modern-day equivalent, despite it not resembling today’s toasters very much on the surface. 
Third-graders will complete the program with a visit to the Hofstra University Museum, where they will examine artifacts, and conclude with a follow-up visit from museum educators to reinforce the program’s theme and concepts learned that further connect with the school’s curriculum. 



West Hempstead Students Investigate Ancient Artifacts

Third-graders at Cornwell Avenue and George Washington elementary schools were tasked with identifying “ancient artifacts” by using their observational skills as part of the Hofstra University “Art Travelers Through Time: Literacy and History Through Art” program.

According to the university’s website, the program provides elementary school students and teachers the opportunity to connect their classroom study of “Communities Around the World” to the study of authentic cultural objects from the museum’s large and diverse collections. These artifacts, and the experience of reading them closely, engage students in the discovery and creative thinking processes, supporting the development of essential 21st century skills and reinforcing classroom learning.

Throughout the program, third-graders engage in three separate interactions with museum educators. The first interaction began in November when Hofstra University Museum educator Elisa Bruno and graduate students Danielle Giovannitti and Brittany Kahn visited both schools to educate students on what observational skills they will need when they examine artifacts in the university’s museum. 

During their visit, Bruno, Giovannitti and Kahn presented four artifacts from circa 1915 for the third-graders to determine what the artifact was and its purpose.

Using their observational skills and magnifying glasses, students were encouraged to examine the color, shape, size, hardware, mechanics and details of the artifact, including manufacturing dates stamped on the bottom and features indicating years of use. Students then recorded their findings and discussed them within their group to determine what they thought the artifact was. 

Concluding the visit, each team presented its findings to the whole class, with all four groups making enough observations about the details of the artifact to correctly determine the object’s modern-day equivalent, despite it not resembling today’s toasters very much on the surface. 
Third-graders will complete the program with a visit to the Hofstra University Museum, where they will examine artifacts, and conclude with a follow-up visit from museum educators to reinforce the program’s theme and concepts learned that further connect with the school’s curriculum. 



VIDEO: Packaging A Thanksgiving Feast

Packaging A Thanksgiving Feast photo

Students, administrators and faculty of the district assisted the West Hempstead High School Key Club’s Thanksgiving food drive on Nov. 15 by packaging more than 50 boxes of canned goods and nonperishable items for local families to enjoy this holiday.

Since September, members of the Key Club have been encouraging students, faculty and residents to drop off donations during the school day, hosting a stuff-the-bus fundraiser at homecoming and asking shoppers for donations at local Stop and Shop grocery stores. 

Key Club members, administrators, students and staff formed an assembly line in one of the school’s hallways to transport the donations from the pantry to the cafeteria. Volunteers sorted and organized the canned beans, soup, green beans, corn, rice, pasta, stuffing, cereal and juice into categorical sections on tables. 

Afterward, volunteers across the district distributed the canned goods and nonperishables into 52 boxes filled with the essentials needed to complete a savory holiday dinner.

 

West Hempstead Middle School Presents Beauty and the Beast Jr.

Beauty and the Beast Jr. Pic

West Hempstead Middle School’s drama club presented Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast Jr.” for students, faculty and community members on Nov. 16 and 17.

Inspired by the original Broadway production, “Beauty and the Beast Jr.” is the story of Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, the Beast, a young prince trapped under the spell of an enchantress, and the lessons they teach one another about transformation and tolerance. If the Beast can learn to love and be loved, the curse will be lifted and he will be become his former self. While time is quickly passing by, the Beast and his household may be doomed for all eternity unless he learns his lesson. 

The cast gave an exceptional performance as they transformed into the characters of Belle, Gaston, Lumiere, Cogsworth and the Beast for the production, which was directed and choreographed by West Hempstead High School alumni Michael Finn and Samantha Lee. Wearing elaborate costumes and using detailed props, the actors transported the audience to a small village in France as they performed all of the classic musical numbers in the beloved fairy tale.

The drama club would like to express their gratitude to Director of Fine Arts Ryan Emmanuel-Cooke and faculty advisor Suzanne Parker-Hall for their unconditional support and dedication to another successful production.   

 

 

Best Buddies Key Club Donation Day

West Hempstead Middle School Family and Consumer Science students package cinnamon loaves to assist the Key Club Donation Assembly

WHUFSD Photo Gallery

October 2017